Copyright 2019 Gold Medal Inspections

WARNING  - Dangers in the House

 

Recalls by the U.S. Government

Most of the latest recalls and danger warnings by manufacturers are listed by the

 U.S. Product Safety Commission - Recalls Related to Household Products

http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/prerel/category/household.html   Household recalls

 

Carbon Monoxide is a colorless, odorless, tasteless- toxic gas.

  
Sources
Unvented kerosene and gas space heaters; leaking chimneys and furnaces; back-drafting from furnaces, gas water heaters, wood stoves, and fireplaces; gas stoves; generators and other gasoline powered equipment; automobile exhaust from attached garages; and tobacco smoke. Incomplete oxidation during combustion in gas ranges and unvented gas or kerosene heaters may cause high concentrations of CO in indoor air. Worn or poorly adjusted and maintained combustion devices (e.g., boilers, furnaces) can be significant sources, or if the flue is improperly sized, blocked, disconnected, or is leaking. Auto, truck, or bus exhaust from attached garages, nearby roads, or parking areas can also be a source.

 

Health Effects
At low concentrations, fatigue in healthy people and chest pain in people with heart disease. At higher concentrations, impaired vision and coordination; headaches; dizziness; confusion; nausea. Can cause flu-like symptoms that clear up after leaving home. Fatal at very high concentrations. Acute effects are due to the formation of carboxyhemoglobin in the blood, which inhibits oxygen intake. At moderate concentrations, angina, impaired vision, and reduced brain function may result. At higher concentrations, CO exposure can be fatal.

 

Symptoms of CO poisoning

The initial symptoms of CO poisoning are similar to the flu (but without the fever). They include:

  • Headache

  • Fatigue

  • Shortness of breath

  • Nausea

  • Dizziness

 

If you suspect that you are experiencing CO poisoning, get fresh air immediately. Leave the home and call for assistance from a neighbor’s home. You could lose consciousness and die from CO poisoning if you stay in the home.

Get medical attention immediately and inform medical staff that CO poisoning is suspected. Call the Fire Department to determine when it is safe to reenter the home.

 

Web Links:

U.S. Government

EPA (Environmental Protection Agency)

http://www.epa.gov/iaq/co.html

Smoke Detectors

http://www.usfa.fema.gov/campaigns/smokealarms/alarms/

Termites

http://www.epa.gov/pesticides/controlling/termite.html